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More Categories: Stata Press Books ; Stata Journal ; Stata Software ; NetCourse ; Courses/Workshops
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First

Stata Press® publications 


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A Course in Item Response Theory and Modeling with Stata

Tenko Raykov and George A. Marcoulides

A Course in Item Response Theory and Modeling with Stata, by Tenko Raykov and George A. Marcoulides, is a comprehensive introduction to the concepts of item response theory (IRT) that includes numerous examples using Stata's powerful suite of IRT commands. The authors' unique development of IRT builds on the foundations of classical test theory, nonlinear factor analysis, and generalized linear models. The examples demonstrate how to fit many kinds of IRT models, including one-, two-, and three-parameter logistic models for binary items as well as nominal, ordinal, and hybrid models for polytomous items.

Chapters 1 and 2 define item response theory and review the statistical concepts and functions that are used to build item response models.

Chapters 3 and 4 discuss classical test theory, factor analysis, and generalized linear models, which provide the conceptual foundations of item response theory.

Chapters 5 and 6 introduce the fundamentals of item response theory and provide examples to illustrate the concepts.

Chapters 7 and 8 cover model fitting, estimation using maximum likelihood theory, item characteristic curves, and information functions.

Chapters 9 and 10 provide a detailed introduction to instrument construction and differential item functioning.

Chapters 11 and 12 introduce IRT models for nominal and ordinal responses as well as multidimentional IRT models.

A Course in Item Response Theory and Modeling with Stata is an outstanding text both for those who are new to IRT and for those who are familiar with IRT but new to fitting these models in Stata. It is a useful text for IRT courses and for researchers who use IRT.


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A Gentle Introduction to Stata, Sixth Edition

Alan C. Acock

Alan C. Acock's A Gentle Introduction to Stata, Sixth Edition is aimed at new Stata users who want to become proficient in Stata. After reading this introductory text, new users will be able not only to use Stata well but also to learn new aspects of Stata.

Acock assumes that the user is not familiar with any statistical software. This assumption of a blank slate is central to the structure and contents of the book. Acock starts with the basics; for example, the part of the book that deals with data management begins with a careful and detailed example of turning survey data on paper into a Stata-ready dataset on the computer. When explaining how to go about basic exploratory statistical procedures, Acock includes notes that will help the reader develop good work habits. This mixture of explaining good Stata habits and good statistical habits continues throughout the book.

Acock is quite careful to teach the reader all aspects of using Stata. He covers data management, good work habits (including the use of basic do-files), basic exploratory statistics (including graphical displays), and analyses using the standard array of basic statistical tools (correlation, linear and logistic regression, and parametric and nonparametric tests of location and dispersion). He also successfully introduces some more advanced topics such as multiple imputation and multilevel modeling in a very approachable manner. Acock teaches Stata commands by using the menus and dialog boxes while still stressing the value of do-files. In this way, he ensures that all types of users can build good work habits. Each chapter has exercises that the motivated reader can use to reinforce the material.

The tone of the book is friendly and conversational without ever being glib or condescending. Important asides and notes about terminology are set off in boxes, which makes the text easy to read without any convoluted twists or forward referencing. Rather than splitting topics by their Stata implementation, Acock arranges the topics as they would appear in a basic statistics textbook; graphics and postestimation are woven into the material in a natural fashion. Real datasets, such as the General Social Surveys from 2002, 2006, and 2016, are used throughout the book.

The focus of the book is especially helpful for those in the behavioral and social sciences because the presentation of basic statistical modeling is supplemented with discussions of effect sizes and standardized coefficients. Various selection criteria, such as semipartial correlations, are discussed for model selection. Acock also covers a variety of commands available for evaluating reliability and validity of measurements.

The sixth edition incorporates new features of Stata 15. All menus, dialog boxes, and instructions for using the point-and-click interface have been updated. Power-and-sample-size calculations for linear regression are demonstrated using Stata 15's new power rsquared command. This edition also includes new sections that describe how to evaluate convergent and discriminant validity, how to compute effect sizes for t tests and ANOVA models, how to use margins and marginsplot to interpret results of linear and logistic regression models, and how to use full-information maximum-likelihood (FIML) estimation with SEM to address problems with missing data.


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A Visual Guide
A Visual Guide to Stata Graphics, 3rd Edition

Michael N. Mitchell

The third edition of A Visual Guide to Stata Graphics is a complete guide to Stata’s graph command and the associated Graph Editor. Whether you want to tame the Stata graph command, quickly find out how to produce a graphical effect, master the Stata Graph Editor, or learn approaches that can be used to construct custom graphs, this is the book to read. 


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An Introduction to Modern?
An Introduction to Modern Econometrics Using Stata

Christopher F. Baum

An Introduction to Modern Econometrics Using Stata,  by Christopher F. Baum, successfully bridges the gap between learning econometrics and learning how to use Stata. The book presents a contemporary approach to econometrics, emphasizing the role of method-of-moments estimators, hypothesis testing, and specification analysis while providing practical examples showing how the theory is applied to real datasets by using Stata.

The gap between learning econometrics and learning how to use Stata. The book presents a contemporary approach to econometrics, emphasizing the role of method-of-moments estimators, hypothesis testing, and specification analysis while providing practical examples showing how the theory is applied to real datasets by using Stata. 


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Stata for Health Researchers
An Introduction to Stata for Health Researchers, Fourth Edition

Svend Juul and Morten Frydenberg

Svend Juul and Morten Frydenberg’s An Introduction to Stata for Health Researchers, Fourth Edition is distinguished in its careful attention to detail. The reader will learn not only the skills for statistical analysis but also the skills to make the analysis reproducible. The authors use a friendly, down-to-earth tone and include tips gained from a lifetime of collaboration and consulting.

The fourth edition has been substantially revised based on new features in Stata 12 and Stata 13. The updated material has been streamlined while including new features in Stata.


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Stata Programming
An Introduction to Stata Programming, Second Edition

Christopher F. Baum

Christopher F. Baum's An Introduction to Stata Programming, Second Editionis a great reference for anyone that wants to learn Stata programming. For those learning, Baum assumes familiarity with Stata and gradually introduces more advanced programming tools. For the more advanced Stata programmer, the book introduces Stata's Mata programming language and optimization routines.

This new edition of the book reflects some of the most important statistical tools added since Stata 10, when the book was introduced. Of note are factor variables and operators, the computation of marginal effects, marginal means, and predictive margins using margins, the use of gmm to implement generalized method of moments estimation, and the use of suest for seemingly unrelated estimation.



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Survival Analysis
An Introduction to Survival Analysis Using Stata, Revised 3rd Edition

Mario Cleves, William Gould, and Yulia V. Marchenko

An Introduction to Survival Analysis Using Stata, Revised Third Edition is the ideal tutorial for professional data analysts who want to learn survival analysis for the first time or who are well versed in survival analysis but are not as dexterous in using Stata to analyze survival data. This text also serves as a valuable reference to those readers who already have experience using Stata’s survival analysis routines.

The revised third edition has been updated for Stata 14, and it includes a new section on predictive margins and marginal effects, which demonstrates how to obtain and visualize marginal predictions and marginal effects using the margins and marginsplot commands after survival regression models.



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Bayesian Analysis with Stata

John Thompson

Bayesian Analysis with Stata is a compendium of Stata community-contributed commands for Bayesian analysis. It contains just enough theoretical and foundational material to be useful to all levels of users interested in Bayesian statistics, from neophytes to aficionados.

The book is careful to introduce concepts and coding tools incrementally so that there are no steep patches or discontinuities in the learning curve. The content helps the user see exactly what computations are done for simple standard models and shows the user how those computations are implemented. Understanding these concepts is important for users because Bayesian analysis lends itself to custom or very complex models, and users must be able to code these themselves. Bayesian Analysis with Stata is wonderful because it goes through the computational methods three times—first using Stata's ado-code, then using Mata, and finally using Stata to run the MCMC chains with WinBUGS or OpenBUGS. This reinforces the material while making all three methods accessible and clear. Once the book explains the computations and underlying methods, it satisfies the user's yearning for more complex models by providing examples and advice on how to implement such models. The book covers advanced topics while showing the basics of Bayesian analysis—which is quite an achievement.

Bayesian Analysis with Stata presents all the material using real datasets rather than simulated datasets, and there are many exercises that also use real datasets. There is also a chapter on validating code for users who like to learn by simulating models and recovering the known models. This provides users with the opportunity to gain experience in assessing and running Bayesian models and teaches users to be careful when doing so.

The book starts by discussing the principles of Bayesian analysis and by explaining the thought process underlying it. It then builds from the ground up, showing users how to write evaluators for posteriors in simple models and how to speed them up using algebraic simplification.

Of course, this type of evaluation is useful only in very simple models, so the book then addresses the MCMC methods used throughout the Bayesian world. Once again, this starts from the fundamentals, beginning with the Metropolis–Hastings algorithm and moving on to Gibbs samplers. Because the latter are much quicker to use but are often intractable, the book thoroughly explains the specialty tools of Griddy sampling, slice sampling, and adaptive rejection sampling.

After discussing the computational tools, the book changes its focus to the MCMC assessment techniques needed for a proper Bayesian analysis; these include assessing convergence and avoiding problems that can arise from slowly mixing chains. This is where burn-in gets treated, and thinning and centering are used for performance gains.

The book then returns its focus to computation. First, it shows users how to use Mata in place of Stata's ado-code; second, it demonstrates how to pass data and models to WinBUGS or OpenBUGS and retrieve its output. Using Mata speeds up evaluation time. However, using WinBUGS or OpenBUGS further speeds evaluation time, and each one opens a toolbox, which reduces the amount of custom Stata programming needed for complex models. This material is easy for the book to introduce and explain because it has already laid the conceptual and computational groundwork.

The book finishes with detailed chapters on model checking and selection, followed by a series of case studies that introduce extra modeling techniques and give advice on specialized Stata code. These chapters are very useful because they allow the book to be a self-contained introduction to Bayesian analysis while providing additional information on models that are normally beyond a basic introduction.



Data Analysis
Data Analysis Using Stata, Third Edition

Ulrich Kohler and Frauke Kreuter

Data Analysis Using Stata, Third Edition, has been completely revamped to reflect the capabilities of Stata 12. This book will appeal to those just learning statistics and Stata as well as to the many users of other packages switching to Stata. Throughout the book, Kohler and Kreuter show examples using data from the German Socioeconomic Panel, a large survey of households containing demographic, income, employment, and other key information.

Data Analysis Using Stata, Third Edition has been structured so that it can be used as a self-study course or as a textbook in an introductory data analysis or statistics course. It will appeal to students and academic researchers in all the social sciences.


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Data Management
Data Management Using Stata: A Practical Handbook

Michael N. Mitchell 


Michael N. Mitchell’s Data Management Using Stata comprehensively covers data-management tasks, from those a beginning statistician would need to those hard-to-verbalize tasks that can confound an experienced user. Mitchell does this all in simple language with illustrative examples. 


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Discovering Structural Equation Modeling Using Stata, Revised Edition

Alan C. Acock

Discovering Structural Equation Modeling Using Stata, Revised Edition, by Alan Acock, successfully introduces both the statistical principles involved in structural equation modeling (SEM) and the use of Stata to fit these models. The book uses an application-based approach to teaching SEM. Acock demonstrates how to fit a wide variety of models that fall within the SEM framework and provides datasets that enable the reader to follow along with each example. As each type of model is discussed, concepts such as identification, handling of missing data, model evaluation, and interpretation are covered in detail.


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Financial Econometrics
Financial Econometrics Using Stata

Simona Boffelli and Giovanni Urga

Financial Econometrics Using Stata  by Simona Boffelli and Giovanni Urga provides an excellent introduction to time-series analysis and how to do it in Stata for financial economists. Aimed at researchers, graduate students, and industry practitioners, this book introduces readers to widely used methods, shows them how to perform these methods in Stata, and illustrates how to interpret the results.   


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Flexible Parametric Survival Analysis Using Stata: Beyond the Cox Model

Patrick Royston and Paul C. Lambert

Researchers wishing to fit regression models to survival data have long faced the difficult task of choosing between the Cox model and a parametric survival model such as Weibull. Cox models can be fit using Stata’s command, and parametric models are fit using which offers five parametric forms in addition to Weibull. While the Cox model makes minimal assumptions about the form of the baseline hazard function, prediction of hazards and other related functions for a given set of covariates is hindered by this lack of assumptions; the resulting estimated curves are not smooth and do not possess information about what occurs between the observed failure times. Parametric models offer nice, smooth predictions by assuming a functional form of the hazard, but often the assumed form is too structured for use with real data, especially if there exist significant changes in the shape of the hazard over time. 

This book is written for Stata 12, but is fully compatible with Stata 11 as well.  


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0016
Generalized Linear Models and Extensions, Fourth Edition

James W. Hardin and Joseph M. Hilbe

Generalized linear models (GLMs) extend linear regression to models with a non-Gaussian or even discrete response. GLM theory is predicated on the exponential family of distributions—a class so rich that it includes the commonly used logit, probit, and Poisson models. Although one can fit these models in Stata by using specialized commands (for example, logit for logit models), fitting them as GLMs with Stata’s glm command offers some advantages. For example, model diagnostics may be calculated and interpreted similarly regardless of the assumed distribution.

This text thoroughly covers GLMs, both theoretically and computationally, with an emphasis on Stata. The theory consists of showing how the various GLMs are special cases of the exponential family, showing general properties of this family of distributions, and showing the derivation of maximum likelihood (ML) estimators and standard errors. Hardin and Hilbe show how iteratively reweighted least squares, another method of parameter estimation, is a consequence of ML estimation using Fisher scoring. The authors also discuss different methods of estimating standard errors, including robust methods, robust methods with clustering, Newey–West, outer product of the gradient, bootstrap, and jackknife. The thorough coverage of model diagnostics includes measures of influence such as Cook’s distance, several forms of residuals, the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria, and various R2-type measures of explained variability.

After presenting general theory, Hardin and Hilbe then break down each distribution. Each distribution has its own chapter that explains the computational details of applying the general theory to that particular distribution. Pseudocode plays a valuable role here because it lets the authors describe computational algorithms relatively simply. Devoting an entire chapter to each distribution (or family, in GLM terms) also allows for the inclusion of real-data examples showing how Stata fits such models, as well as the presentation of certain diagnostics and analytical strategies that are unique to that family. The chapters on binary data and on count (Poisson) data are excellent in this regard. Hardin and Hilbe give ample attention to the problems of overdispersion and zero inflation in count-data models.

The final part of the text concerns extensions of GLMs. First, the authors cover multinomial responses, both ordered and unordered. Although multinomial responses are not strictly a part of GLM, the theory is similar in that one can think of a multinomial response as an extension of a binary response. The examples presented in these chapters often use the authors’ own Stata programs, augmenting official Stata’s capabilities. Second, GLMs may be extended to clustered data through generalized estimating equations (GEEs), and one chapter covers GEE theory and examples. GLMs may also be extended by programming one’s own family and link functions for use with Stata’s official glm command, and the authors detail this process. Finally, the authors describe extensions for multivariate models and Bayesian analysis.

The fourth edition includes two new chapters. The first introduces bivariate and multivariate models for binary and count outcomes. The second covers Bayesian analysis and demonstrates how to use the bayes: prefix and the bayesmh command to fit Bayesian models for many of the GLMs that were discussed in previous chapters. Additionally, the authors added discussions of the generalized negative binomial models of Waring and Famoye. New explanations of working with heaped data, clustered data, and bias-corrected GLMs are included. The new edition also incorporates more examples of creating synthetic data for models such as Poisson, negative binomial, hurdle, and finite mixture models.


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Health Econometrics Using Stata
Health Econometrics Using Stata

Partha Deb, Edward C. Norton, Willard G. Manning

Health Econometrics Using Stata by Partha Deb, Edward C. Norton, and Willard G. Manning provides an excellent overview of the methods used to analyze data on healthcare expenditure and use. Aimed at researchers, graduate students, and practitioners, this book introduces readers to widely used methods, shows them how to
perform these methods in Stata, and illustrates how to interpret the results. Each method is discussed in the context of an example using an extract from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey.

After the overview chapters, the book provides excellent introductions to a series of topics aimed specifically at those analyzing healthcare expenditure and use data. The basic topics of linear regression, the generalized linear model, and log and Box-Cox models are covered with a tight focus on the problems presented by these data. Using this foundation, the authors cover the more advanced topics of models for continuous outcome with mass points, count models, and models for heterogeneous effects. Finally, they discuss endogeneity and how to address inference questions using data from complex surveys.

The authors use their formidable experience to guide readers toward useful methods and away from less recommended ones. Their discussion of "health econometric myths" and the chapter presenting a framework for approaching health econometric estimation problems are especially useful for this aspect.


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Interpreting
Interpreting and Visualizing Regression Models Using Stata

Michael N. Mitchell

Michael Mitchell’s Interpreting and Visualizing Regression Models Using Stata is a clear treatment of how to carefully present results from model-fitting in a wide variety of settings. It is a boon to anyone who has to present the tangible meaning of a complex model in a clear fashion, regardless of the audience. As an example, many experienced researchers start to squirm when asked to give a simple explanation of the practical meaning of interactions in nonlinear models such as logistic regression. The techniques presented in Mitchell's book make answering those questions easy. The overarching theme of the book is that graphs make interpreting even the most complicated models containing interaction terms, categorical variables, and other intricacies straightforward.

This book is a worthwhile addition to the library of anyone involved in statistical consulting, teaching, or collaborative applied statistical environments. Graphs greatly aid the interpretation of regression models, and Mitchell’s book shows you how.


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Time_series
Introduction to Time Series Using Stata

Sean Becketti

Introduction to Time Series Using Stata, by Sean Becketti, provides a practical guide to working with time-series data using Stata and will appeal to a broad range of users. The many examples, concise explanations that focus on intuition, and useful tips based on the author’s decades of experience using time-series methods make the book  insightful not just for academic users but also for practitioners in industry and government. 

The book is appropriate both for new Stata users and for experienced users who are new to time-series analysis. Introduction to Time Series Using Stata, by Sean Becketti, is a first-rate, example-based guide to time-series analysis and forecasting using Stata. It can serve as both a  reference for practitioners and a supplemental textbook for students in applied statistics courses.




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